The Textile Museum of Canada offers a range of educational resources to complement a visit to the Museum, extending learning back to the classroom. These educational resources also provide access and opportunities to engage with the rich content online, including the TMC’s award-winning web projects, its archive of past exhibitions, and its online collection database of more than 13,000 objects from around the world. Resource guides are developed for each exhibition, outlining curriculum connections to a wide range of subject areas, anticipating questions that might arise and addressing challenging subject matter, while also providing educators with classroom activities to explore exhibition themes in greater depth. Links to resource guides for current and past exhibitions are included below.

Narrative Threads

Narrative Threads takes its inspiration from a quintessential Canadian handicraft, the story quilt. Made from scraps of many fabrics, some brand new and some long worn, a story quilt combines carefully crafted panels into a larger multi-generational narrative. What makes this particular quilt “great” is not its size, but the fact that Canadians of any age, background, and skill level, can craft their own panel. No story is too small, or too different, to be Canadian.

At the core of the website are 175 textile, folk, and handicraft artifacts selected from permanent collections of the project’s lead institution – the Textile Museum of Canada – and five regional museum partners across Canada: Saskatchewan’s Western Development Museum, Niagara Historical Society & Museum, Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, Delta Museum & Archives, and the Manitoba Crafts Museum & Library. Inviting user submissions as well, the site creates an inclusive experience for all participating. Working together, our aim is to make a virtual quilt every bit as messy, complex, and wonderful as the country we call home.

Using the Narrative Threads resource guide, students will contribute their own object and story to the site; will explore how their submission contributes to a national collective narrative about Canada and Canadians; and will gain critical insight into what motivates people to create and hold on to objects. Each section of this resource guide prepare students to engage with and master these three desired outcomes through activities based around discussion, hands-on creation, writing and drawing, and group activities.

The resource guide is available in English and French.


TXTilecity is an online platform and mobile app that highlights the evolving role that textiles have played in shaping Toronto’s urban landscape. The website provides access to community stories and personal recollections in the form of rich media content – audio and video files – organized on an interactive map of Toronto. Since the fall of 2012, the TMC has been offering TXTilecity walking tours to students from K-12 and other community organizations.

The TXTilecity Resource Guide is intended to provide teachers and learners with a road map with which to navigate this content. The Resource Guide can be used to offer context for classroom activities before and after a TXTilecity tour, or it can be used to enhance exploration of the TXTilecity website in the classroom or at home.

The TMC has also developed a teaching kit to provide support for educators to facilitate their own walking tour of downtown tour; the teaching kit also provides activities to allow youth to effectively navigate and respond in a personal way to the stories they encounter.

Developed through the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation and Mozilla Hive Toronto, the teaching kit can be found here.

Fashion Futures

Fashion Futures is a series of shareable open source learning modules that encourage creative/critical explorations of the future of what we wear and our interactions with our environment through an interdisciplinary, hands-on approach to investigative design and knowledge-building. Workshop modules provide points of entry to explore issues related to personal identity, entrepreneurship, sustainability and consumerism as well as develop proficiencies in 3D printing, garment design, sewing, wearable electronics and surface design.

Developed through the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation and Mozilla Hive Toronto, the five workshop modules can be found here: