On Growth and Form: textiles and the engineering of nature

Date: Jun 6 - Oct 11, 2001
Artist: Kenneth Snelson, Chueck Hoberman, Ann Richards, Donald E. Ingber, Sophie Roet, Apotex Medical Textiles; Claudy Jongstra, Aniko Meszaros, Geotextiles
Curated by: Philip Beesley, Rachel Machenry, Evelyn Von Michalofski

The 2001 exhibition On Growth and Form: textiles and the engineering of nature is the third of three exhibitions that form the series 100% Natural, and an extraordinary presentation of textiles in a complex interdisciplinary exhibition.

This exhibition travels several parallel avenues as it establishes the idea that art, science and nature are intertwined when it comes to the creation and utilization of textile structures. The invention and reinvention of these new forms shape diverse areas of endeavour from the world of fashion to the world of advanced medicine.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Philip Beesley, Rachel MacHenry and Evelyn von Michalofski have created an extraordinary and unique presentation of textiles in a complex interdisciplinary exhibition.On Growth and Form: textiles and the engineering of nature is an exhibition that travels several parallel avenues as it establishes the idea that art, science and nature are intertwined when it comes to the creation and utilization of textile structures. 

Textile systems, by turn, inform and are informed by architectural prototypes, medical cellular forms, and even the wings of bats and children's toy construction sets. The invention and reinvention of these new forms shape diverse areas of endeavour, such as the fashion world and the world of advanced medicine, while geotextiles prevent soil erosion, support healthy water systems and nurture plant growth.

Over 2,000 years ago the Roman polyglot Cicero observed that “We sow corn, we plant trees, we fertilize the soil by irrigation, we confine the rivers and straighten or direct their courses. In short, by means of our hands, we create a second nature within the natural world.”

 

ESSAY

Making Nature, By Philip Beesley