Spin Cycle: recycling and reclaiming textile traditions

Date: Jun 14, 1997 - Jan 25, 1998
Artist: Barbara Klunder, Luisa Cevese, Chaurauqua, Jac Scott, Zoë Hope, Clare Goddard, Rachel Roberts, Santa Fe Weaving Co. Ltd, Anne Hung, Pia Myrvold, Swift Textiles Inc, Reiko Sudo for Nuno Corporation, Crispina Designs, Eco Fibre Inc., Allegro Natural Dyes, Design Tex, Robin Kay, Natural Cotton Colours Inc, Mountain Equipment Co-op, Carole Collet, JuJu Vail, Bev Hisey, Chilkoot/Haveersack, Fuminori Ono, Artifacts from the Museum's Collection
Curated by: Margot Fagan, Machenry Rachel, Lynne Milgram

The 1997 exhibition Spin Cycle focuses on traditions of - and current developments in - recycled and reused textiles. Throughout history, and across cultures, people have reconstructed, refashioned and reinvented textiles in response to environmental, cultural and political concerns. Spin Cycledraws parallels between historic and ethnographic textile artifacts and current art and design practices, putting a “new spin” on the ecology of functional and decorative textiles.

The Museum for Textiles presents an exhibition focusing on traditions of - and current developments in - recycled textile products and processes. Throughout history and across cultures, people have reconstructed, refashioned and reinvented textiles in response to social, cultural and political concerns. Spin Cycle draws parallels between historic and ethnographic textile artifacts and current art and design practices, putting a “new spin” on recycling and ecology.
 

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Spin Cycle brings together diverse contemporary works from all over the world. Quirky and fun innovations pose as potent models of possibility: Pia Myrvold's (Norway) street wear made from plastic Parisian shopping bags; Clare Goddard's (England) fabrics made from used tea bags; Anne Hung's (Canada) up-to-the-minute mini-dress created with junk-food packaging; Luisa Cevese's (Italy) handbags using scrap materials reclaimed from Italy's textile industry; Robin Kay's (Canada) influential hemp and cotton knitwear imbued with ecological sensibilities, and; Barbara Klunder's (Canada) 1997 funky hooked “rug painting,” entitled jazz Cat.

And from the textile manufacturing industry: Swift Textiles' (U.S.A.) “Soda Pop” denim made from recycled plastic bottles; Nuno's (Japan) sculptural fabrics utilizing scrap steel wire from the metal industry, and; Eco Fibre's (Canada) environmentally friendly fabrics created with textile waste fibres.

On view from the Museum collection are early- to mid-20th century hooked rugs from Newfoundland's Grenfell Mission; Indian and Canadian pieced quilts; a Zambian bamboo dance skirt decorated with a variety of bottle caps; Indonesian pounded bark-cloths patterned with natural pigment, and; Philippine garments fashioned from natural abaca plant fibres.

This exhibition is supported by the Canada Council, Canada Trust Friends of the Environment Foundation, and Dominion Textile Inc.


ESSAY

Spin Cycle: recycling and reclaiming textile traditions, By Margot Fagan, Rachel MacHenry