Skip the navigation
 

The Fabricated World

Play

Wall hanging Zoomify

In its widest interpretation, the phenomenon of “play” – whether alone or as part of a group – expresses everything that makes life enjoyable. Played activities such as sports contain patterned elements in the form of rules and prescribed actions, which link sports to other forms of human expression such as mathematics and art.

About the Object

Object name: Wall hanging
Place made: Canada
Date made: 1940 - 1950
Dimensions: 90 x 65 cm
Materials & Techniques: Synthetic fibre, jacquard-woven
Credit line: Textile Museum of Canada
ID: T2006X0146

A lone hockey player skates toward the viewer in this enigmatic portrait. The location is impossible to identify except for the ghostly light stands and banked seats that place the scene in an arena. The anonymous player is decked out in full team gear with the word “Canada” on his jersey.

Alternative Views

Back

Back

Oblique

Oblique

Back Oblique

Back Oblique

Note: clicking a thumbnail image will open a high-resolution version.

Second Look

Macro

Macro

Microscopic Views

Microscopic Views


Description: A microscopic view at 3x magnification
Credit: Macrography Courtesy of Sandra Webster-Cook of the AGO

Microscopic Views

Microscopic Views


Description: A microscopic view at 12.5x magnification
Credit: Macrography Courtesy of Sandra Webster-Cook of the AGO

Microscopic Views

Microscopic Views


Description: A microscopic view at 20x magnification
Credit: Macrography Courtesy of Sandra Webster-Cook of the AGO

Note: clicking a thumbnail image will open a high-resolution version.

Touchpoint View

Animation

You must enable javascript and have Flash Player 9 installed to view this content.

Note: clicking a link will load a movie into a media player.

Audio Clip

The Hockey Sweater

Listen to Hockey Hall of Fame curator Philip Pritchard talk about the hockey sweater.

Credit: Audio produced by TMC

You must enable javascript and have Flash Player 9 installed to view this content.

Transcript

The game was traditionally played outdoors. So, obviously, because the games were outdoors on natural rinks, the equipment and the jerseys had to…work towards the player’s advantage so, for the jersey it’d be warm so it’d be wool, the equipment would be lighter. As time went on, hockey became an indoor sport and artificial rinks were being made, so the jersey altered as well. So did the equipment. The jerseys no longer had to be pure wool, they could be a combination of, of wool and poly and cotton. And in today’s game where there’s the whites of the ice, there’s the television lights, and there’s up to 20 000 plus seats being filled by people in the game, we have a natural warmth created by everyone. So in today’s environment the jersey is 100% polyester and it’s tied in with the new air…air dry jersey so when a player is playing, although they have the t.v. lights on them and everything, their sweat absorbs instantly. And in today’s technology that’s what a jersey is needed for a player to play at this caliber. So, as you’ve seen over a hundred years the jerseys have altered a lot, but it’s all because of the way the game has altered as well.

Video

Hockey’s place in winter

Watch a video of children playing hockey on an outdoor rink in Canada in the 1940s.

Credit: Video Courtesy of National Film Board of Canada

You must enable javascript and have Flash Player 9 installed to view this content.

Artifact Narrative

Jacquard portraits

Before the invention of the jacquard loom, very little cloth with figurative imagery was woven. Tapestry and drawloom-made brocade – the only woven structures capable of producing a recognizable image – were rare because of the time required to make them. In 1804, French inventor Joseph Marie Jacquard introduced the loom that still bears his name. Although other inventors laid the groundwork for Jacquard, it was his loom that mechanized the operation of lifting and lowering warp threads by means of a machine with perforated cards. The jacquard loom has been called the ancestor of the first computers, which also used perforated cards to create instructions in binary code.

Portrait

Portrait

Place made: Lyon, France
Date made: 1849-1852
Dimensions: 28 x 27 cm
Materials & Techniques: Silk, jacquard-woven
Credits: Gift of John and Gisela Sommer
ID: T01.4.1

Collection Connections

Note: links will open in new browser windows.

Portrait

Portrait

ID*: T01.4.2

Picture

Picture

ID*: T95.0273

Portrait

Portrait

ID*: T2005.28.1