Lace fan

Brussels Mixed, a combination of bobbin and needle lace, is secured to mother of pearl staves and shaped to create this elegant fan. The needle lace in the central rose design is gauzy point de gaze, while the border is Duchesse de Bruxelles bobbin lace. Note the delicate etching and metallic tracing on the mother of pearl.


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    Fan

    Asia: South Asia, India, Western India, Gujarat, Saurashtra

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  • Fan

    Fan

    Asia: East Asia, Japan

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  • Fan

    Fan

    Asia: South Asia, India, Western India, Gujarat, Kutch, Bhuj

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Do you consider lace feminine, and if so, why?

responded: Jan 29, 2012

Posted by Kelsie Bryson

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Today, lace is seen as strictly feminine. With its dainty and intricate design, it is reminiscent of women’s undergarments and precious apparel. It is without a doubt a trendy textile in our society, but one would never find lace in a men’s store or department. The delicate look and feel of lace is essentially the opposite of the modern man’s dress. Although this is the case today, centuries ago lace was actually considered to be unisex. It became especially popular during the 16th century as the lace making industry spread rapidly through Europe. At this point it was worn by both sexes to portray wealth. North America was introduced to lace during the 19th century but by this point in time, it was more appealing to women. Lace has an extensive history, from décor to menswear to, today, strictly women’s garments. It is hard to say if lace will make a comeback in men’s design, but I wouldn’t be counting on it anytime soon.

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