Lace fan

Brussels Mixed, a combination of bobbin and needle lace, is secured to mother of pearl staves and shaped to create this elegant fan. The needle lace in the central rose design is gauzy point de gaze, while the border is Duchesse de Bruxelles bobbin lace. Note the delicate etching and metallic tracing on the mother of pearl.


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    Fan

    Asia: South Asia, India, Western India, Gujarat, Saurashtra

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  • Fan

    Fan

    Asia: East Asia, Japan

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  • Fan

    Fan

    Asia: South Asia, India, Western India, Gujarat, Kutch, Bhuj

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Do you consider lace feminine, and if so, why?

responded: Jan 29, 2012

Posted by Neda K

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Lace is a form of fabric created by leaving patterned holes in the cloth. Lace has been present in the evolution of fashion, and even worn by men: in the 12th century the “Vandyke” collar, a decorative collar made of lace, was popular amongst men’s fashion. However, as fashion evolved lace became more exclusive to women’s wear rather than men’s, and today lace on a men’s garment is rare to come by. Lace is now considered more of a feminine fabric due to it’s features: it is created with intricate designs inspired by flower shapes (which are often associated with women), the see-through cutouts allude to female sensuality by allowing peeps of the skin below to show, and it’s structure is fragile and delicate (traits often linked with females). Popular culture has also furthered fashions’ association of lace to femininity through Princesses (a title which is often connected with the ultimate girls dream); one of this century’s most famous outfits, the wedding gown worn by Grace Kelly, was compromised of lace. And this gown later inspired the popular lace dress for Kate Middleton. Furthermore, fashion designers have adopted lace feverishly into their women’s wear designs, such as Valentino and Dior who create intricate gowns made of lace. Due to the structure of the fabric and popular culture’s use of it, lace now exudes femininity.

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