Lace fan

Brussels Mixed, a combination of bobbin and needle lace, is secured to mother of pearl staves and shaped to create this elegant fan. The needle lace in the central rose design is gauzy point de gaze, while the border is Duchesse de Bruxelles bobbin lace. Note the delicate etching and metallic tracing on the mother of pearl.


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    Fan

    Asia: South Asia, India, Western India, Gujarat, Saurashtra

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  • Fan

    Fan

    Asia: East Asia, Japan

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  • Fan

    Fan

    Asia: South Asia, India, Western India, Gujarat, Kutch, Bhuj

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Do you consider lace feminine, and if so, why?

responded: Jan 30, 2012

Posted by Ofelia Liu

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I consider lace feminine because of the intricate patterns and delicate materials used. Lace can be made from cotton, silk, flax, or synthetic fibers. Before mass production, all lace was handmade. An experienced lacer will spend up to two hours just to make one inch of lace. The process was incredibly tedious and time consuming which made lace that much more valuable. Only those who were wealthy would be able to afford lace. Women who made their own lace, were highly respected because of the skill and patience involved. I feel that understanding the process and production adds to the femininity because of the time and skill it took to create something so luxurious. Today, lace is often used on lingerie and undergarments as the fabric or as a design detail. For many people, this could be the main reason why we associate lace with femininity. However, lace isn’t only used for undergarments, designers such as Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Alexander McQueen, and Valentino all used lace as outerwear for Spring 2011 ready to wear. Many of these garments are sheer and reveals the outline and shape of a women’s body.

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