Blouse

White blouses and skirts with red embroidery comprise a woman’s traditional wedding costume in Romania. The colour red symbolizes life and fertility. In Romanian folk songs, women sing about blooming red flowers embroidered on their wedding costumes expressing their hopes for a long and happy marriage.


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Why do you think embroidered eastern European blouses were so popular in North America during the 1960s and ’70s?

responded: Jan 29, 2012

Posted by Marta K

175
Recommend this Response
During the 1960s a counter-culture social movement was making its way into North America, following through into the 1970s. In short, people were no longer set on living out the “American Dream”, and many social movements were on the rise, including the sexual revolution, the anti-war movement, feminism, environmentalism and more. It was a time of change and breaking free from the traditional values of the ’50s. A subculture known as the “hippies” evolved and the present day “boho-chic” look is based on the fashions of their bohemian style. Some may not know that the original term “bohemia” is a former historical region in eastern Europe that is present day Czech Republic. The original term “bohemian” comes from the French word for “gypsy”, and so bohemian style has a free spirited, nomadic, and non bourgeois connotation. The embroidered eastern European blouses were extremely popular in the hippie culture of the ‘60s and ‘70s as they represented this kind of lifestyle. The blouses were hand embroidered and spoke out against the mass produced, which was slowly becoming a way of life. Bohemian inspired looks can still be found on runways by designers such as Chloe and throughout retailers all over the world. Different takes on the folk peasant blouse to this day give off a free spirited, “world traveler” edge.

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