Hat

Woven like a basket, this salakot is hard and helmet-like, but light. The cast metallic decorations and finial indicate a man of high status wore it. The woven inner band keeps the hat in place on the wearer’s head. Today, this traditional weaving technique is used to make attaché cases and handbags.


Collection Connections 

  • Hat (Asia)

    Hat (Asia)

    Asia: South East Asia, Philippines, Mindanao area, Socsargen- North Cotabato

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  • Hat (Asia)

    Hat (Asia)

    Asia: South East Asia, Philippines, Mindanao area, Zamboanga Peninsula- Basilan

    View More 
  • Hat (Asia)

    Hat (Asia)

    Asia: South East Asia, Philippines, Luzon area

    View More 

How did the maker of this hat achieve its nearly perfect round shape?

responded: Apr 1, 2010

Posted by Carlo Singh

296
Recommend this Response
It seems as if the structure of this hat is based on a round clay bowl. The shape and design of this hat is very unique. A possible way that the hat could have been made is by simply using the bowl as a basic outline. The bowl would have been placed on a fairly flat surface such as a table. Before starting the process the braided rope could have been soaked in water, allowing further flexibility of the material. Then the braided rope would have been wrapped strategically and in a uniform pattern around the circumference of the bowl, starting from the base. This would have been done until the desired shape and pattern was achieved. Once at the top, the metal piece that is pointing out could have acted as a supporting column in a way such that it would securely hold the finely tightened ropes in place, thus allowing them to loosen up. After this, the hat would be placed in the sun to allow the ropes to dry and expand during the day and contract during the cold nights. This would allow the hat to make one uniform shape. To further strengthen the structure, another clay bowl could be placed on top of the hat, which is still sitting on top of the other bowl. The reason for this would be for the two bowls to act like an oven but at the same time not allowing the rope to be burned. Then the hat would be subjected to a fire which would help to permanently make the ropes dry and tight. Last but not least, the rivets seem as they were pierced through the finely braided rope as decoration and as something symbolic to the designated person.

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